Curriculum Divisions And Course Description

The Seminary offers two degrees, Bachelor of Arts in Theology (BA/Th) and Bachelor of Arts in Religious Education (BA/RE). The curriculum for the degree programs of LBTS has eight major divisions: Biblical Studies, Church History, Pastoral Studies, Theological Studies, Education, Religious Education Studies, Missions and Liberal Arts. There are three concentrations in the Bachelor of Arts in Theology: Pastoral Studies, Systematic Theology and Missions. The three concentrations in Religious Education Studies are: Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education and Secondary Education.

The Objectives for the eight divisions of the degree programs are:

Biblical Studies: To prepare students to develop his/her understanding of the content, general historical background, and development of the Bible, including to develop critical thinking skills that lead to better understandings of interpretation.

Church History: To prepare students to develop the knowledge and critical thinking skills to express the ways he/she understands, relates to, and identifies with the Christian church in its ever-changing contexts.

Pastoral Studies: To prepare students to develop critical thinking skills that will assist in the ability to apply the insights of biblical studies and historical/theological studies in the contexts of acquiring skills in evangelism, biblical interpretation, public worship, preaching, pastoral care, and Christian living.

Religious Education Studies: To prepare students to acquire and apply critical thinking skills  needed to plan and administer a program of Christian education for a local church or denomination with the intent to foster Christian character, and to equip church members for service and/or to acquire and apply critical thinking skills  needed to plan and administer a program of education for a local church school or other private or public setting with the intent to foster Christian character, and to equip students for life-long learning.

Theological Studies: To prepare students to develop critical thinking skills needed to express the content of his/her faith in conversation with Scripture, traditions, reason, and experience.

Education:    To prepare the student to demonstrate the skills needed to teach Religion on the elementary or secondary level in a manner which reflects an understanding of the scientific and historical developments in education.

Missions:  To prepare the student called to Cross-Cultural Missions to share the Gospel with limited cultural hindrances and to present Christ as the only legitimate alternative for salvation.

Liberal Arts:   To provide the student with basic knowledge and skills in supporting disciplines which will under gird and enhance learning experiences at the Seminary and enable students to relate more effectively to others.

Division of Biblical Studies

BBST 131 Old Testament Introduction                                                               

An introduction to the traditional texts of the Old Testament (thirty-nine books) in their canonical and historical settings with attention to literary style, themes, and theology of each book. Attention will be given to the ways each part of the Old Testament contributes to the unifying themes of the Christian Bible. 

BBST 132 New Testament Introduction

An introduction to the traditional texts of the Old Testament (thirty-nine books) in their canonical and historical settings with attention to literary style, themes, and theology of each book. Attention will be given to the ways each part of the Old Testament contributes to the unifying themes of the Christian Bible        

BBST 232 Biblical Interpretation BBST 131 and 132 are prerequisites)

A study of various methods of interpretation and principles of interpretation found in the broad history of the church ranging from historical-critical methods to literary methods generally accepted by Christian scholars and practitioners.

BBST 230 Biblical Backgrounds (two courses from BBST

101 through 104 are prerequisite)

A study of the archaeology, historical geography, and cultural backgrounds of Bible lands and peoples. A practical application of the use of historical contexts as a tool for the interpretation of the Bible will be included.

BBST 330 The Pentateuch (BBST 131 or BBST 132 is prerequisite)

An analytical, historical, and interpretative study of the Pentateuch with particular attention to the patriarchal narratives and the foundational events and ideas in Israel’s religion as seen in the Exodus experience, the law codes, and the cultic institutions of Israel.

BBST 331 The Major Prophets (BBST 101 or BBST 102 is prerequisite)

A study of the Major Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, in their historical contexts, drawing insights, as needed, from 1-2 Kings and 1-2 Chronicles. The study will include investigations of the biographies of the prophets, the literary features of the texts (e. g., narrative, poetry, and apocalyptic), and the influence of these prophetic books upon the subsequent development of Christianity.

BBST 332 The Minor Prophets (BBST 101 or BBST 102 is prerequisite)

A study of the Minor Prophets: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. The study will include investigations of the biographies of the prophets, the literary features of the texts (e.g., narrative, poetry, and apocalyptic), and the influence of these prophetic books upon the subsequent development of Christianity.

BBST 333 Pauline Corpus (BBST 131 or BBST 132 is prerequisite)

A study of the letters of Paul, including the issues of authorship, provenance, audience, and theological development. The letters will be approached chronologically, according to the broad consensus of New Testament scholarship. The letters also will be examined according to natural groupings of letters, such as early letters (1 and 2 Thessalonians), the Pauline Core (Romans, Galatians, and 1-2 Corinthians), Prison Letters (Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians, and Philemon), and the Pastorals (1-2 Timothy and Titus).

BBST 334 General Letters (BBST 131 or BBST 132 is prerequisite)

A study of letters not attributed to Paul, including the issues of authorship, provenance, audience, and theological development. The letters also will be examined according to natural groupings, such as the Petrine Letters (1-2 Peter and Jude), Hebrews, James, and the Johannine Letters (1-2-3 John).

BBST 337 Directed Readings in Old Testament (faculty approval required): 1-2 hours

Students who develop an interest or a curiosity about particular ideas that emerge from their Old Testament studies may request an approved faculty member to help them develop a reading list for a semester that will help come to better understanding of an idea. Depending upon the idea, the list may develop sufficient assignments to warrant one or two hours of credit. The reading list should include specific passages from the Old Testament and appropriate reading in secondary sources, such as journals, commentaries, Bible dictionaries, and, in some cases, sermons. Students/faculty should agree upon a minimum of twenty pages of written work (summary and analysis papers) for each hour of credit. Further descriptions are in a separate document.

BBST430 Old Testament Book Study (BBST 101 or BBST 102 is prerequisite)

An in-depth exploration of a book, or collection of books, in the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible, that gives students a focused understanding of the historical, literary, and theological features the focus of study. Possible topics could include major works in the Old Testament, such as Exodus or Job, or collections such as the Festival Scrolls (Ruth, Esther, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, and Ecclesiastes), the Priestly History (Ezra, Nehemiah, 1 and 2 Chronicles).

BBST 433 Old Testament Poetry and Wisdom (BBST 131 or BBST 132 is prerequisite)

An analysis of Hebrew poetry, with special attention to elements of Hebrew poetry, figures of speech, imageries and idioms, and interpreting OT poetic passages. The goal is to help students develop skills in interpreting OT poetic passages and preaching from them with greater facility and certainty, to guide the Church from misunderstanding and misusing this portion of Scriptures. The specific poetic books to treat are Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastics and Song of Songs.

BBST 435 Old Testament Theme Study (BBST 131 or BBST 132 is prerequisite)

An intra-textual exploration of a theme in the Old Testament that illuminates ways the Old Testament develops concepts such as covenant, providence, sin, grace, suffering, worship, the role of women, violence, the place of the poor, or the Day of the Lord.

BBST 437 Directed Readings in New Testament (faculty approval required): 1-2 hours

Students who develop an interest or a curiosity about particular ideas that emerge from their New Testament studies may request an approved faculty member to help them develop a reading list for a semester that will help come to better understanding of an idea. Depending upon the idea, the list may develop sufficient assignments to warrant one or two hours of credit. The reading list should include specific passages from the New Testament and appropriate reading in secondary sources, such as journals, commentaries, Bible dictionaries, and, in some cases, sermons. Students/faculty should agree upon a minimum of twenty pages of written work (summary and analysis papers) for each hour of credit. Further descriptions are in a separate document.

BBST 435 New Testament Apocalyptic Literature (BBST 131 or BBST 132 is prerequisite)

A study of the apocalyptic passages from the Gospels (i. e., Mark 13, Matthew 24, and Luke 21) identified as “the little apocalypse” or “the Olivet Discourse”), and the Revelation. The study will include exploring the different ways the passages have been understood throughout history.

BBST 441 New Testament Book Study (BBST 103 or BBST 104 is prerequisite)

An in-depth exploration of a book, or collection of books, in the New Testament that gives students a focused understanding of the historical, literary, and theological features the focus of study. In addition to a focus upon a particular book, topics could include collections in the New Testament such as the Johannine literature (John, Johannine Letters, and the Revelation), the Prison Letters, or the Pastorals.

BBST 451 New Testament Theme Study (BBST 103 or BBST 104 is prerequisite)

A intra-textual exploration of a theme in the New Testament that illuminates ways the New Testament develops concepts such as covenant, providence, sin, grace, suffering, worship, the role of women,  the place of the poor, atonement, and the church.

BBST 452 Independent Study in Biblical Studies (faculty approval required)

By the junior year some students may have envisioned a project of study they want to pursue. Independent Study in Biblical Studies allows students to seek faculty guidance to pursue a specific topic with the intent of conducting independent research and the writing of a paper of at least 10,000 words. Further descriptions are in a separate document.

BBST 456 Honors Thesis (BBST455 Honors Research is prerequisite)

Students with a 3.0 grade point average by the end of the Junior year are encouraged to pursue the thesis requirement for graduation. The thesis is a guided study with an approved faculty mentor that will focus on a specific issue of interest in the student’s area of specialization that is relevant to the Church, society, or subject area. Original research is encouraged. The details of the thesis are provided in a separate document.

CHST 131 Church History I                                                             

A study of Christian History that begins with Jews living in the Roman world into which Christianity was born and the foundation of Christianity laid in the birth, life, death, resurrection and message of Jesus confessed to be the Christ. The development of the main stream of Christianity is followed through the fifteenth century. Special attention will be given to the Apostolic Fathers, the rise of the Councils (beginning with Nicaea in 325), and the developments of monasticism and the rise of the Roman Church.

CHST 132 Church History II

A study of Christian History beginning with the Reformation movements (Luther, Zwingli, Calvin) and the counter-Reformation (Council of Trent and the Anabaptists) and the subsequent developments up until the present time.

CHST 230 Christianity in Africa

A study of the beginnings and development of Christianity on the African continent with the likes of Origen, Tertullian, and Augustine. Special attention will be given to the Christian churches in Africa during and since the days of colonization.

CHST 231 The Church in Liberia (CHST 131 and CHST 132 are prerequisite)

A study of the contemporary diversity of Liberian Christianity, including traditional denominations such at Roman Catholic, Anglican, Baptist, Methodist, Lutheran, Presbyterian, etc. Also included are groups such as Latter Day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah’s Witness, Salvation Army. Some attention will also be given to the presence of non-denominational groups in Liberia, including recent movements across Africa. A key feature of the course will be visitors from various groups and required visits by students to observe/participate in services.

CHST 233 Baptist History (CHST 121 and CHST 122 are prerequisite) 

An examination of the origins in 1609 of the Baptist movement among English separatists and how it developed into a world-wide denomination. Attention will be given to key figures in history and contemporary settings. Central will be the development of a Baptist identity that is part of nearly all Baptist groups in history: soul freedom, Bible freedom, Church freedom, and religious liberty. A unit of study of the Baptist World Alliance will demonstrate the diversity, unity, and strength of Baptists “in our one world,” as Dr. Tolbert was fond of saying.

CHST 330 History of Christian Theology/THST 331 History of Christian Theology

An examination of church history with a primary emphasis upon pivotal periods during which different methods and traditions emerged and changed the shape of theological confessions. Periods of interest include the Patristic Period that saw the rise of council-based traditions, the Middle Ages from Augustine to Aquinas gave structure to catholic theology, the Reformation that forced new understandings of the relationship between scripture and traditions, the Enlightenment/Modern Period that elevated reason and experience to the level of scripture and tradition, and the Post-modern (or Late-modern) Period and the emergence of a rich array of contextual theologies.

CHST 335 Liberian Baptists

A study of the origin, development, and growth of major Baptist presence in Liberia such as the Liberia Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention and the Lott Carey Mission.

CHST 375 Directed Readings (faculty approval required): 1-2 hours

Students who develop an interest or a curiosity about particular ideas that emerge from their church history studies may request an approved faculty member to help them develop a reading list for a semester that will help come to better understanding of an idea. Depending upon the idea, the list may develop sufficient assignments to warrant one or two hours of credit. The reading list should include specific documents passages from church history and appropriate reading in secondary sources, such as journals, monographs, and histories and, in some cases, sermons. Students/faculty should agree upon a minimum of twenty pages of written work (summary and analysis papers) for each hour of credit. Further descriptions are in a separate document.

CHST452 Independent Study in Church History (faculty approval required)

By the junior year some students may have envisioned a project of study they want to pursue. Independent Study in Church History allows students to seek faculty guidance to pursue a specific topic with the intent of conducting independent research and the writing of a paper of at least 10,000 words. Further descriptions are in a separate document.

CHST 456 Honors Thesis (BBST455 Honors Research is prerequisite)

Students with a 3.0 grade point average by the end of the Junior year are encouraged to pursue the thesis requirement for graduation. The thesis is a guided study with an approved faculty mentor that will focus on a specific issue of interest in the student’s area of specialization that is relevant to the Church, society, or subject area. Original research is encouraged. The details of the thesis are provided in a separate document.

ENGL 131 Freshman English I                     

An exploration of formal English grammar, usage, mechanics, and effective expression, with attention to recognizing and employing appropriately the various levels of English usage, logical thinking, speaking, and writing effectively.

ENGL 132 Freshman English II                   

Introduces students to critical thinking and the fundamentals of writing with attention given to writing activities employing descriptive, narrative, expository, argumentative, imaginative paragraphs, and essays.

ENGL 231 Sophomore English II                             

Continues to develop college writing with increased emphasis on critical essays, argumentation, and research. This course offers increased writing skills in planning, writing, and rewriting, stressing effective organization, and significant content of a research paper. It gives special attention to the research process, providing opportunities for the student to develop a topic and write a preliminary draft of the research paper.

ENGL 232 Sophomore English II

The course is a continuation of ENGL 231 with particular attention given to the writing of a fully developed term paper. Additional opportunities are given for students to write book reports, critical review of journals using acceptable conventions.

ENGL 350 Intermediate Research and Writing

This course is designed to enable students develop a topic and write a BA level thesis. The course is especially important for students as they look forward to writing their honor theses in the final year of their studies.

FREN 131 Introduction to French I: 4 hours                                                           

This course is introductory French. Emphasis is placed on reading, listening, and speaking skills through  presenting situations, relevant to everyday life, and oral exercises.

FREN 132 Introduction to French II: 4 hours                                                         

This course is a continuation of French 131. It provides additional materials in terms of grammar and vocabulary.

BBGK 331 Elementary Greek I

A study of New Testament Greek grammar with attention given to vocabulary development, noun morphology, verb morphology, prepositions and articles.

BBGK 332 Elementary Greek II

A continuation of GK 331 with attention given to the mastery of verb morphology, participles, clausal constructions and translation of portions of the New Testament (Gospel of John).

BBGK 431 Greek Syntax

Introduces the student to lexical and exegetical tools for New Testament studies, and focuses upon building skills for reading and interpreting the New Testament documents. Translation is from the Gospel of John.

BBGK 432 Book Exegesis

Is the application of the student’s skills to a selected New Testament book. Translation is from both the Gospels and 1 John, and others selected by the instructor.

BBHB 331 Biblical Hebrew I

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew. Major emphasis is on the assimilation of basic grammatical forms and vocabulary.

BBHB 332 Hebrew Grammar II

The course is a continuation of the first course, with focus on the remainder of the verbal system for the purpose of attaining competency in Biblical Hebrew grammar. Attention will be given to reading some selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament.

Mathematics

MATH 131 Mathematics

An introduction or review to basic mathematic skills from computation to simple algebra that allows students to develop a foundation to develop proficiency in the mathematical skills required for personal and business purposes, including in the context of the church.

MATH 132 Mathematics

An exploration of the basic mathematic skills required of a leader in church and community. Special attention will be given to the development of spreadsheets, budgets, pro-forma, requisitions, and receipts production.

PSST 130 Spiritual Formation

A course designed to help students develop and deepen spiritual resources for personal growth and ministry. Subjects dealt with include call to ministry, prayer, praise, critical and devotional uses of the Bible, and spiritual formation through the disciplines of the Christian life.

PSST 233 Worship and Music

A study of the theology and practice of Christian worship that examines the development and practice of biblical worship in Israel and right into the New Testament. Attention is given to Christian worship in contemporary Africa, with emphasis on the methods and resources that would enhance biblical worship.

PSST 234 Life of the Pastor

An exploration of the practical dimensions of the demands of being a pastor in the Liberian context. Topics will include: keeping the call alive, continuing education, preserving a personal Sabbath, caring for the pastor’s family, scheduling and setting priorities, coordinating with a staff, relationships with lay leaders, sermon preparation and planning, dealing with crises, and relating to colleagues in ministry.

PSST 235 Stewardship/RLES 235 Stewardship

A study of biblical models for stewardship with particular emphasis is given to the concept of holistic stewardship (heart, head, and hand) as presented in the New Testament.

PSST 236 – Christian Ethics

This course studies the foundational issues of ethics by examining the various ethical theories and methods that have provided the framework for understanding and interpreting what is moral and immoral, as well as addressing various applied ethical issues facing the church specifically and society in general, especially in the African context.

PSST 237 – Hermeneutics

This course explains the importance of understanding the African context and world views and how these influence the interpretation of the Bible.  Students will be provided with the basic principles of an intercultural model of hermeneutics to arrive at a reliable interpretation of the Scriptures.  General principles of hermeneutics will be examined, along with specific guidelines for biblical interpretation with a focus on the historical-literary-theological interpretation and application of the Scriptures.  The importance of reliance on the Holy Spirit, paying attention to context, knowing the ancient culture and recognizing the different types of literary genre and the applicable special rules regarding the interpretation of types, symbols, poetry, proverbs, parables, and prophecy are highlighted.  The student will develop an appreciation of the theological, literary and historical/cultural contexts of the biblical text to effectively apply the biblical text to the African context.

PSST  331 Homiletics I: Principles

A study of the principles of preaching as they relate to the interpretation of texts and preparation of sermons.

PSST 332 Homiletics II: Practice

A study of the preparation and delivery of sermons in which sermons preached by the students become the basis for analysis of sermon content, structure, and delivery. At least one sermon by each student will be delivered in a chapel service.

PSST 432 Field Education (requires field placement or staff position in a local church)

A weekly seminar course designed to enhance the awareness of the student and focus on her/his activity in the areas of the pastoral ministry, worship, intra and interpersonal relationship, and evangelism

PSST 433 Pastoral Care and Counseling

An introduction to the basic principles and techniques of counseling, with opportunities provided for practical application and evaluation of counseling skills. It studies the theological basis for pastoral care and an examination of the procedures and problems in the pastoral ministry.

PSST 456 Honors Thesis (PSST 455 Honors Research is prerequisite)

Students with a 3.0 grade point average by the end of the junior year are encouraged to pursue the thesis requirement for graduation. The thesis is a guided study with an approved faculty mentor that will focus on a specific issue of interest in the student’s area of specialization that is relevant to the Church, society, or subject area. Original research is encouraged. The details of the thesis are provided in a separate document.

PSST 457 – Ministry Practicum

The Intern Practicum is a practical application of ministry goals and skills through ministry assignments overseen by a field supervisor.

RLES 132 Introduction to Religious Education

A study of the theological and professional bases for religious education in the context of church and community with an examination of the various teaching agencies of the church, giving particular attention to Sunday School, Church Training, and Missionary organizations.

RLES 233 Principles and Dynamics of Teaching (RLES 132 is prerequisite)

A study of the practical means of improving the educational quality of teaching in the church and community and their teaching organizations. Emphasis is placed on practical considerations involved in teaching in the classroom.

RLES 234 Stewardship/PSST 234 Stewardship

A study of biblical models for stewardship with particular emphasis is given to the concept of holistic stewardship (heart, head, and hand) as presented in the New Testament.

RLES 333 Church Administration (RLES 132 is prerequisite)

A study of leadership and the theory and practice of administration in the local church including planning, organizing, staffing, supervising and evaluating the programs and ministry of the church.

RLES 334 Ministry to Adults (RLES 132 is prerequisite)

A study of the principles and practice of teaching adults, including those who have not had opportunity for formal education, in the church and community. Special emphases include: how adults learn, literacy training, and the role of adult Sunday School in adult education.

RLES 335 Ministry to Adults Practicum (RLES 132 and RLES 331 are prerequisite)

Supervised practice of principles learned in RLES 331. Students will be involved in teaching adults on a one-to-one basis, or in small groups.

RLES 336 Ministry to Children (RLES 132 is prerequisite)

A study of the spiritual development and needs of children up to twelve years old, as well as methods and materials for teaching this age group. Students are exposed to learning materials and ways of securing and utilizing local materials for working with children. The role of the home in the religious education of children is also stressed.

RLES 337 Ministry to Youth (RLES 132 is prerequisite)

A study of adolescence and youth with the emphasis on planning the church’s program to meet their spiritual needs. Special attention is given to the role of the Youth Minister.

RLES 456 Honors Thesis (RLES 455 Honors Research is prerequisite)

Students with a 3.0 grade point average by the end of the Junior year are encouraged to pursue the thesis requirement for graduation. The thesis is a guided study with an approved faculty mentor that will focus on a specific issue of interest in the student’s area of specialization that is relevant to the Church, society, or subject area. Original research is encouraged. The details of the thesis are provided in a separate document.

GEED 131 Study Habits (3Hours)

This course focuses on how to read with comprehension, develop a quality academic paper, do simple research and other related study skills to enhance ones productivity in the academic community. The aim is to help the student acquire personal study skills, note taking skills, book summary. skills, developing good study habits and using different types of someone materials.

EDUC 330 Foundations of Education

A survey of the historical development of educational thought and practice. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of philosophical skill as well as synthesis of a personal philosophy of education

EDUC 331 Educational Methods in Elementary School

A study of the content, methods, and materials used in teaching on the elementary school level.

EDUC 332 Educational Methods in Secondary Schools

A study of the content, methods, and materials used in teaching on the secondary school level

EDUC 437 Curriculum Development (RLES 132 is prerequisite)

An examination and analysis of curriculum development  as they relate to design, implementation, and evaluation of the primary, elementary, and secondary curricula of Liberia.

EDUC 430 Seminar in Liberian Education

A survey of historical and current practice in public and private education. Emphasis is given to organization, administration, personnel, curriculum, and environmental concerns.

EDUC 433 Guidance

A study of principles and methods of guidance to help teachers and counselors meet the major developmental needs of their students. Group and individual guidance procedures will be presented.

EDUC 431 Testing and Evaluation

A study of the relationship of testing and evaluation to lesson planning and educational objectives. Developing skills in constructing, administering and evaluating tests is the goal of this course.

EDUC 433 Educational Administration

An analysis of the nature, scope and development of education administration, the social, economic, historical, and other factors impinging on education administration, and the principles and practice of sound education administration. Students will be acquainted with the educational laws of the country’s administrative and instructional supervision, and the broad administrative relationships in the Liberian education system.

EDUC 434 Instructional Media and Graphic (3Hours)

This course focuses on the principles of graphic design, as they apply to commercially created advertisement and materials, as well as everyday computer generated publications such as classroom assignments, signs forms, graphs charts and on screen presentations. The aim is to provide the student with broad-based understanding of graphic design, the use of software such as Microsoft power point CorelDraw and presentation.

EDUC 456 Practice Teaching (placement required): 12 hours

Practice teaching in an elementary or secondary school under the guidance of a supervising teacher of the elementary school and an LBTS instructor. A full semester of five days per week and must be taken in the senior year.

PHIL 331 Introduction to Philosophy                      

An introduction to the works and ideas of western and non-western philosophers that emphasizes how philosophical questions and their answers have been dealt with by different thinkers in different contexts. Evaluation is based on the development of familiarity with the ideas examined as well as critical thinking and rhetorical skills essential for functioning effectively in philosophical argument.

PHIL 332 Philosophy of Religion                                                                       

The development of a philosophical approach to Christian theism. A dialectical examination of Christian theism in relation to science, Marxism, Leninism, dialectical materialism, Freudian psychology, logical positivism, the problem of evil, freedom and determinism, relativism and absolutism in world religions.

SOSC 232 Introduction to Liberian Society             

An exploration of the social, economic, ethnic, and political institutions of Liberia. Emphasis is placed on Liberian economy, the population, the powers, and chieftaincy system of the political structure and various cultural groups in the Liberian society.

SOSC 331 Introduction to Sociology

This introduction to sociological reasoning critically and scientifically examines the social forces and processes that shape our personalities, institutions, culture, and society.

SOSC 334 Marriage and the Family                                                

A study of the development of the family as a social institution from a Christian perspective, emphasizing dating, courtship, marriage and divorce. Consideration is given to the role and relationship of family members. Attention also will be given to the Liberian context, including traditional marriage and burial practices.

PSYC 233 The Psychology of Development and Learning              

A study of human growth and development as it relates to understanding  behavior and the process of learning and adjustment.

PSYC 332 Educational Psychology

A study of theories of learning and instruction as these relate to the planning of effective strategies to promote learner development.

PSYC 334 Child Development (3Hours)

This course focuses on the different developmental stages in children: mentally, socially, spirituality, and physically. The aim is to help the student understand how to effectively minister to the child and to accept the child as he/she goes through each stage of development.

PSYC 335 Adolescent Development (3Hours)

This course introduces the students to the transition from childhood to adolescence and the challenges the adolescent goes through. The aim is to help the student understand the changes the individual adolescent goes through and the characteristics of the adolescent and minister to him/her following biblical principles.

THST 131 Introduction to Theology I                                              

An introduction to the disciplines of theology, its branches, and relationships between them and other disciplines. Topics include prolegomena, theology proper (doctrine of God), revelation, creation, angelology (doctrine of angels), anthropology (doctrine of humanity), and hamartiology (doctrine of sin).

THST 132 Introduction to Theology II                                            

Continues from THST 131 and concentrates on Christology (doctrine of Jesus as Christ), soteriology (doctrine of salvation), pneumatology (doctrine of the Holy Spirit), demonology (doctrine of evil spirits), ecclesiology (doctrine of the Church), and eschatology (doctrine of the last things).

THST 230 Christian Ethics/PSST 230 Christian Ethics

An examination of the basic principles of Christian Ethics with attention given to the nature and basis of human conduct as it relates to moral freedom, obligation, and value judgment with application to current social problems in the African context.

THST 233 Baptist Theology (CHST 231 and THST 131 are prerequisites)           

An examination of the history and development of Baptist theology broadly embraced by Baptists with attention to the controversies between so-called “general Baptists” and “particular Baptists. ” A central focus will be the use of confessions of faith, beginning in the seventeenth century and continuing in the twenty-first.

THST 334 Theological Thinking

An introduction to the art and discipline of theological thinking that explores the conventional sources of theology (scripture, reason, tradition, and experience) and provides opportunities for students to become self-consciously reflective about the how and why of constructing a coherent theological confession.

THST 331 History of Christian Theology/CHST 331 History of Christian Theology

An examination of church history with a primary emphasis upon pivotal periods during which different methods and traditions emerged and changed the shape of theological confessions. Periods of interest include the Patristic Period that saw the rise of council-based traditions, the Middle Ages from Augustine to Aquinas gave structure to catholic theology, the Reformation that forced new understandings of the relationship between scripture and traditions, the Enlightenment/Modern Period that elevated reason and experience to the level of scripture and tradition, and the Post-modern (or Late-modern) Period and the emergence of a rich array of contextual theologies.

THST 333 Pauline Theology (THST 131 or THST 132 is prerequisite)                  

A study of the development of Paul’s theology within the social and cultural milieu of the first century. Special attention is given to issues of law and grace, ethics, salvation, women in ministry, tongues, spiritual gifts, church and social order.

THST 334 Non-Western Theologies (THST 131 or THST 132 is prerequisite)    

An analysis of theology done by theologians in the 2/3 world, such as Liberation theology, Black theology (USA and South Africa), African theologies, and Asian theologies. Western theologies like Black Theology (USA) and Feminist Theology may be considered here as well. Focus is on the context, methods, hermeneutics, conclusions and application of these theologies to the situation of the student. The students should also see how those theologies affect their ministries.

THST 335 Old Testament Theology A study of content and methods useful in constructing a coherent theology of the Old Testament. The course includes the writing of a significant research paper.

THST 336 New Testament Theology

A study of content and methods useful in constructing a coherent theology of the New Testament. The course includes the writing of a significant research paper.

THST 435 Issues in Contemporary Theology(THST 131 and 132 are prerequisites) 

The primary focus is a review of theological thinking (THST 201), followed by an exploration of contemporary theological and ethical issues, trends, and practices that demand coherent Christian responses. The course will address issues of global  and local interest.

THST 437 Theme Study

Studies of specific doctrines, such as Anthropology, Soteriology. Christology, Ecclesiology, Eschatology. Students may have no more than two theme studies for the major or minor.

THST 456 Honors Thesis (THST 455 Honors Research is prerequisite)

Students with a 3.0 grade point average by the end of the Junior year are encouraged to pursue the thesis requirement for graduation. The thesis is a guided study with an approved faculty mentor that will focus on a specific issue of interest in the student’s area of specialization that is relevant to the Church, society, or subject area. Original research is encouraged. The details of the thesis are provided in a separate document.

MISS 233 Evangelism and Discipleship

This course examines the theological principles and practical ministry strategies involved in evangelism and discipleship. Special emphasis is given to personal witnessing, church revival, and perennial evangelism, caring for new converts, evangelism of children and youth. Attention given to the communication of the gospel to Muslims and followers of African Traditional Religion. This course also focuses on the concept of disciple-making in general, as well as plans and strategies for creating a disciple-building environment that can be used in a campus ministry and a local church.

MISS 333   History and Theology of Missions

The study of the biblical character and theological roots of missions. Emphasis will be given to the world-wide expansion of Christianity from the apostolic times to the present. Special attention is given to the planting of Christianity in Africa. Emphasis will also be made on the theological foundations for mission theory and practice from biblical and historical perspectives. Notable theologies of missions, significance of doctrines vital to missions and its post-modern day applications will be discussed.

MISS 334 Finance and Management

The Study of financial management of the mission and the budget presentation as a means to ascertain the financial picture or forecast of missions.

MISS 336 Cultural Anthropology

An anthropological study of the institution of culture. The purpose is to enable the students to understand their culture and prepare them to relate to persons of another culture.

MISS 431 World Religions

An historical, critical and comparative study of the major living religions of the world. More emphasis will be given to the study of Islam.

MISS 433 Church Planting and Growth

A study of the principles, strategies and methods of church planting and church growth. Emphasis will be placed on the practical relevance, contemporary trends and evaluation of postmodern perspectives on church planting and growth.

MISS 434 Vocational and Short Term Missions

A critical study of the biblical basis to doing vocational and short term missions. The implication of doing ministry as a home and global occurrence are examined. The development, principles and current trends in this type of ministry will be addressed. Thus, attention is given to potential areas of ministry and issues of inter/and cross-cultural communications with a view to raising awareness and appreciation of other peoples’ viewpoints. Class members will be challenged to reflect on their personal attitude to others and its implications for their call to missions generally and specifically.

MISS 435 Current Issues in Cross-Cultural Missions

A study of selected issues relating to cultural differences and factors affecting crossing boundaries in missions. Emphasis will be made on the dynamic nature of culture and the gospel, the ethical implication of cross-cultural work and the dangers to effective relationships across culture.

MISS 436 Power Encounter

This course explores biblical concept of spiritual power as it relates to God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, angels, Satan and demons, clarifying the influence of worldviews which accept or reject the concept of the presence of spiritual power. It deals with spiritual warfare as it affects the personal lives of Christians and as it is encountered cross-culturally in bring people from the control of Satan to Commitment to God.

MISS 437 Missions Practicum

This course is a four-week field practical during the June-August vacation period. The course comprises of both study and practice of church planting, missionary ministries, missions’ survey and church growth activities. The student studies literature on these matters and then has the opportunity to apply them in both home and foreign missionary contexts. Faculty and field supervisors are required for assessments as well as the official sponsorship of a denomination and churches.